Teacher tried to stop Washington state shooting – seattlepi.com

TULALIP, Wash. (AP) — A newly hired teacher confronted a gunman and was being hailed as a hero on Saturday after a deadly shooting rampage in the cafeteria of a Washington state high school.

First-year social studies teacher Megan Silberberger intervened in the attack Friday at Marysville-Pilchuck High School, teachers union president Randy Davis said.

The teacher intercepted the gunman as he paused, possibly to reload, student Erick Cervantes told KIRO-TV.

“I’m completely amazed by her actions and I feel for her,” Davis told The Associated Press. “I don’t know why she was in the cafeteria but I’m just grateful she was there.”

The attacker killed one girl on Friday and seriously wounded four others — including two of his cousins — before he died of what police said was a self-inflicted wound.

However, it wasn’t clear if the shooter committed suicide or if he accidentally shot himself in the struggle with the teacher.

A school resource officer also ran to the scene, Davis said.

The shooter was Jaylen Fryberg, a popular freshman at the school, a government official with direct knowledge of the shooting told The Associated Press. The official spoke on condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to speak to the media.

Students and parents said Fryberg was a member of a prominent family from the nearby Tulalip Indian tribes and a freshman who played on the high school football team. He was introduced at a football game as a prince in the 2014 Homecoming court.

Fryberg left months of troubling messages on social media, and friends said he’d recently been in a fight over a girl. One of his tweets said, “It breaks me … It actually does …”

The tight-knit Native American community on scenic Puget Sound struggled to cope with the tragedy.

Davis said he had spoken briefly with Silberberger, who was traumatized. The Marysville School District released a statement from her.

“While I am thankful and grateful for the support from everyone, at this time I am requesting privacy for myself and my family,” Silberberger said.

Students said the gunman stared at his victims as he fired. The shootings set off chaos as students ran outside in a frantic dash to safety, while others huddled inside classrooms.

Lucas Thorington, 14, had known the victims and the shooter since middle school.

“He had a good life. He was very well known,” Thorington said Saturday. “I don’t know what happened.”

Authorities said a .40-caliber handgun was recovered at the shooting scene.

Three of the victims had head wounds and were in critical condition Saturday. Two 14-year-old girls were at Providence Everett Medical Center, and were identified by the facility as Shaylee Chucklenaskit and Gia Soriano. Andrew Fryberg, 15, was at Harborview Medical Center in Seattle, a hospital official said.

Providence said the next three days will be key in the girls’ treatment.

Soriano’s family released a statement, saying they appreciated “your thoughts and prayers. Our hearts go out to the other victims and their families.”

Another victim, 14-year-old Nate Hatch, was listed in serious condition at Harborview, the hospital said. Family members told KIRO that Andrew Fryberg, Hatch and Jaylen Fryberg are cousins.

Two other students were treated at the high school for minor wounds, authorities said.

Witnesses described the shooter as methodical inside the cafeteria.

“I heard six shots go off, and I turned and saw people diving under the tables,” said 18-year-old Isabella MacKeige. “I thought, ‘Run!’”

Marysville-Pilchuck High School has a number of students from the Tulalip Indian tribes. The reservation juts into the eastern rim of Puget Sound, where a series of rocky beaches form its border.

State Sen. John McCoy, a tribal member, said the community met in private Friday night and a prayer service was set for Saturday.

McCoy said the shooter’s grandmother was his secretary for about 15 years.

“The family, both sides, are very religious,” he said. “If I were to walk into their homes right now, they would probably be praying.”

McCoy said everyone is searching for answers.

“What triggered him? That’s what we need to find out,” he said. “Because from all we have determined, he was a happy-go-lucky, normal kid.”

___

Bellisle reported from Seattle. Associated Press writer Rachel La Corte contributed from Olympia, AP writer Manuel Valdes contributed from Marysville and AP writer Chris Grygiel contributed from Seattle.

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Few details offered on quarantines over Ebola, drawing criticism from nurse – Fox News

ebola-Bellevue-Hospital .jpg

Oct. 8, 2014: Bellevue Hospital nurse Belkys Fortune, left, and Teressa Celia, Associate Director of Infection Prevention and Control, wear protective suits in an isolation room in the Emergency section of the hospital during a demonstration of procedures for possible Ebola patients in New York. (AP/File)

A nurse who treated Ebola patients in Sierra Leone is the first test case of quarantine policies now in effect in three states over heightened fears the deadly virus could be spread by health care workers returning to the United States.

But the sketchy details of how such quarantines will be handled drew sharp criticism from humanitarian organization Doctors Without Borders while infectious disease experts said many of the logistics about enforcement are likely still up in the air.

Kaci Hickox, a Doctors Without Borders nurse, remained isolated at a hospital Saturday, a day after she returned to the U.S. and the governors of New York, New Jersey and Illinois announced mandatory 21-day quarantines for arriving travelers who had contact with Ebola patients in West Africa.

Health officials said Hickox was transported to a hospital after running a fever, but the nurse told the Dallas Morning News she was merely flushed because she was upset by a quarantine process she described as treating her like a criminal.

“This is not a situation I would wish on anyone, and I am scared for those who will follow me,” Hickox wrote in an essay for the newspaper.

Health officials said preliminary tests for Ebola come back negative for Hickox but Newark University Hospital would not say if she would be released for the balance of the quarantine period or remain in the hospital.

Doctors Without Borders executive director Sophie Delaunay complained about the “notable lack of clarity” from state officials about the quarantine policies.

“We are attempting to clarify the details of the protocols with each state’s departments of health to gain a full understanding of their requirements and implications,” she said in a statement.

The aid organization said Hickox has not been issued an order of quarantine specifying how long she must be isolated and is being kept in an unheated tent. It urged the “fair and reasonable treatment” of health workers fighting the Ebola outbreak.

Indeed, health officials in all three states with quarantine policies did not return messages Saturday from The Associated Press seeking details about enforcement.

Dr. Irwin Redlener, a Columbia University professor and director of the New York-based Director National Center for Disaster Preparedness, said the logistics of such a policy are “a problem.”

“The challenge now is how you translate this quarantine plan to operational protocol,” said Redlener, who has been involved in discussions with New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio and New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo on who should be under home quarantine and how to monitor them. That could involve case managers who keep an eye on home-bound people, Redlener said.

Cuomo and New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie on Friday imposed a quarantine of 21 days — the incubation period of the deadly virus — on travelers who have had contact with Ebola patients in the countries ravaged by the virus — Liberia, Guinea and Sierra Leone. A similar measure was announced in Illinois, where officials say such travelers could be quarantined at home.

The quarantine measures were announced after a New York physician working for Doctors Without Borders returned from Guinea was admitted to Manhattan’s Bellevue Medical Center earlier this week to be treated for Ebola.

Michael Osterholm, an infectious disease epidemiologist and biosecurity expert at the University of Minnesota, said any quarantine should be based on the fact that Ebola can only be transmitted when a person has symptoms of the disease.

“All of us in public health would agree that we don’t want to have Ebola patients infecting others, but we also have to base how we stop that on the science we know,” Osterholm said. “This quarantine hasn’t truly been defined. What do we mean by this?”

He noted that even a person who had been in contact with an Ebola patients becomes infectious only after manifesting symptoms of sickness such as an elevated temperature. And even then, he said, Ebola is transmitted only through bodily fluids.

But Redlener said the point of quarantine is not to find people who have symptoms. “It’s people who have had some kind of contact, and until we can establish that they don’t have Ebola, we don’t want them to be walking around.”

Osterholm and Redlener warned that quarantines might discourage doctors and nurses from going to West Africa to help, an issue raised by aid groups and Dr. Rick Sacra, one of the American health care workers successfully treated for Ebola contracted while he worked in Liberia.

“Until Ebola is under control in Africa, we’re never going to see the end of such cases coming to the United States,” Redlener said.

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New York Ebola Patient Enters More Serious Phase of Illness, Officials Say – New York Times

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New York Times
New York Ebola Patient Enters More Serious Phase of Illness, Officials Say
New York Times
The condition of New York City's first Ebola patient, Dr. Craig Spencer, worsened on Saturday, though he remained awake and communicative, health officials said. Dr. Spencer, 33, was “entering the next and more serious phase of his illness, as anticipated …
Experts: Quarantines may dissuade Ebola volunteersUSA TODAY
Few details offered on quarantines over Ebola, drawing criticism from nurseFox News
New York Ebola patient stable as quarantines beginLos Angeles Times
Reuters -Fort Worth Star Telegram -BBC News
all 5,232 news articles »

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Tested Negative for Ebola, Nurse Criticizes Her Quarantine – New York Times

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New York Times
Tested Negative for Ebola, Nurse Criticizes Her Quarantine
New York Times
A nurse who had worked with Ebola patients in West Africa was placed under quarantine at University Hospital shortly after she landed at Newark Liberty International Airport on Friday. Credit Robert Stolarik for The New York Times. Continue reading the …
Quarantined Nurse Lashes Out After She Tests Negative for EbolaWall Street Journal
Health care worker criticizes quarantine processSFGate
NYC Ebola Patient's Fiancee to Leave for Home QuarantineBusinessweek
NBCNews.com -The Detroit News
all 5,209 news articles »

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Tested Negative, Nurse Criticizes Her Quarantine – New York Times

[unable to retrieve full-text content]


New York Times
Tested Negative, Nurse Criticizes Her Quarantine
New York Times
A nurse who had worked with Ebola patients in West Africa was placed under quarantine at University Hospital shortly after she landed at Newark Liberty International Airport on Friday. Credit Robert Stolarik for The New York Times. Continue reading the …
Experts: Quarantines may dissuade Ebola volunteersUSA TODAY
Nurse Under Ebola Quarantine Criticizes Her TreatmentHuffington Post
Ebola-negative nurse quarantined in Newark: I was treated 'as if I was a criminal'New York Daily News
ABC News -NBCNews.com -Washington Post
all 1,552 news articles »

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Bill De Blasio Dines At The Meatball Shop To Calm Ebola Fears – Huffington Post

New York Mayor Bill de Blasio ate lunch at The Meatball Shop in Manhattan’s Greenwich Village Saturday, four days after Ebola patient Dr. Craig Spencer reportedly dined there and one day after the restaurant temporarily closed for a Health Department inspection.

New York City Health Commissioner Dr. Mary Bassett, who joined de Blasio and his wife, Chirlane McCray, for the meal, shared a photo on Twitter:

In a subsequent tweet, Bassett said the Meatball Shop’s owner, Daniel Holzman, told her there was a line down the block when it reopened for business Friday night, adding that it was his “proudest day as a New Yorker.”

As news of Spencer’s case — and the activities he partook in during the days leading up to his diagnosis — spread through New York City, authorities have gone out of their way to ensure residents that the establishments he visited before he tested positive for Ebola are safe to patronize.

In addition to his meal at The Meatball Shop, de Blasio went out of his way to take the subway on Friday, as did New York Governor Andrew Cuomo, who last week announced the transit system would be subject to random Ebola drills.

Spencer allegedly rode the A, 1 and L trains Wednesday evening before experiencing a fever and diarrhea the next morning, sparking unfounded fears that other MTA passengers risked contracting the virus. Ebola can only be spread through direct contact with the bodily fluids of a patient presently exhibiting symptoms, and officials maintain Spencer showed no signs of the disease until Thursday.

Meanwhile, Brooklyn Borough President Eric bowled at Williamsburg’s Gutter on Saturday, which Spencer also visited Wednesday evening. The bowling alley had reopened a few hours earlier after shutting down Thursday night for a cleaning and health inspection.

Like The Meatball Shop, The Gutter took to social media to thank its followers for an outpouring of support. “We can’t tell you how much your support has meant to us, but now we are happy to get back to being your little neighborhood bowling alley,” a Facebook post read.

On Friday, New Yorkers riding the A train and milling about at Bellevue Hospital, where Spencer is currently being held in isolation, told The Huffington Post that they weren’t worried about Ebola. “I am as nervous as any prudent concern would make me,” Davis Marcey-Neil, a writer taking the A train, said. “I’m a New Yorker. We can handle it.”

Read more from HuffPost on Ebola:
The Uncensored Reality Of Covering Ebola As A Journalist
All The Times The World Tried To Warn Us
Why We Won’t Have An Ebola Vaccine For Years
The Most Destructive Ebola Myths, Debunked
What Actually Happens When A Person Is Infected

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‘He Seemed Like A Normal Kid’: Rage Behind Washington Gunman’s Spree – NBCNews.com

By M. Alex Johnson

Just last week, Jaylen Ray Fryberg was smiling and waving to the crowd at Marysville Pilchuck High School’s homecoming ceremony. He’d just been crowned freshman homecoming prince. But inside, terrible turmoil was raging.

Law enforcement sources told NBC News that Fryberg was the student who pulled out a small handgun and opened fire on a table full of students in the cafeteria Friday morning at the school in Marysville, about 35 miles north of Seattle. A girl was killed and four other young people were seriously or critically wounded, and Fryberg soon was dead himself of a self-inflicted gunshot wound.

“He seemed like a normal kid,” Madison White, 16, a junior, told NBC News. Erick Cervantes, 16, a junior, told NBC News: “He seemed like a nice guy, and he had lots of friends.”

Others called Fryberg a happy guy who was popular with his classmates. He was proud of his Native American heritage as a member of the Tulalip Tribes. He was a member of the wrestling and football teams.

But the Jaylen Fryberg who walked into the cafeteria Friday morning was blank-faced and angry, staring down each victim as he pulled the trigger of his .40-caliber Beretta pistol, classmates said. The Snohomish County Sheriff’s Office, which spent Friday night investigating inside the school, said they recovered a .40-caliber handgun.

“He looked very mad” on Friday, Erick said. The sheriff’s office said Saturday morning that investigators interviewed more than 100 witnesses, and determined that a cafeteria worker attempted to stop Fryberg. But everything happened too fast.

It was all over in four minutes, Marysville police Cmdr. Robb Lamoureux said. The first anonymous call to 911 came in at 10:39 a.m. By 10:41, the school resource officer was on the scene, and by 10:43, it was confirmed that “the shooter was down,” Lamoureux said. The wounded were being treated by 10:49 — just 10 minutes after the incident began.

All four of them — two girls and two boys — are under the age of 18 and weren’t identified. They were initially taken to Providence Regional Medical Center in Everett, where the 14-year-old girls — later identified as Shaylee Chuckulnaskit and Gia Soriano — were in critical condition with gunshot wounds to the head Friday night. Joanne Roberts, the hospital’s chief medical officer, said they remained in “very critical condition” Saturday morning, and that the “next three days are going to be crucial.”

A 15-year-old boy had surgery for a gunshot wound to the head at Providence and was then taken to Harborview Medical Center in Seattle, where he was in critical condition. The fourth victim, a 14-year-old boy, was also taken to Harborview, where he was in serious condition with a gunshot wound to the jaw. Two other students were treated at the school for minor injuries, according to Shari Ireton, director of communications at the Snohomish County Sheriff’s Office.

School is canceled next week, and more than 100 people attended a vigil Friday night to comfort one another.

IMAGE: Jaylen Ray FrybergJAYLEN_RAY_33 VIA INSTAGRAM

Jaylen Ray Fryberg, the student who opened fire at Marysville Pilchuck High School in Marysville, Washington, on Friday.

Police haven’t released any motive in the attack. But classmates said Fryberg had recently gotten into an argument with another student that had racial overtones, and law enforcement sources said he may have been in a recent dispute over a girl.

In posts on Twitter, Fryberg seemed heartbroken over a breakup.

Sometime in mid-June, Fryberg began tweeting often-profane and sexually charged sentiments. Many of the posts appear to express his despair at having lost his girlfriend, whose identity isn’t made clear.

“Don’t talk to you? ohk! That’s what I was doing last night!” he tweeted in mid-June.

“I know it seems like I’m sweating it off. But I’m not.”

Fryberg largely stopped tweeting through July and the first half of August. Then he began sending a stream of angry tweets on Aug. 20: “Your not gonna like what happens next!” one read, followed by: “Tell me what your plan is….You can’t make a bond with anyone like the bond me and you have right now…. Tell me what your going to do…”

The same day: “I hate that I can’t live without you.”

On Sept. 18, Fryberg sent another series of angry tweets addressed to a second party who isn’t identified. “Did you forget she was my girlfriend?” he begins. Then: “Dude. She tells me everything. And now. I f—ing HATE you! Your no longer my “Brother”!”

Tuesday — less than a week after he’d been all smiles at his homecoming coronation — Fryberg tweeted: “I know it seems like I’m sweating it off. But I’m not. And I never will be able to,” and “I should have listened…. You were right… The whole time you were right…”

Early Thursday morning, about a day and a half before the shooting, Fryberg sent this final tweet:

First published October 25 2014, 1:59 AM

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Wash. student gunman may have targeted cousins, friends – USA TODAY

Family members confirm that at least two victims in the Marysville-Pilchuck High School shooting are related to the shooter.

A high school cafeteria worker tried to stop a gunman who killed one girl and shot four other students before taking his own life inside the cafeteria at a school north of Seattle, officials said Saturday.

Government officials identified the gunman in Friday’s shooting at Marysville-Pilchuck High School as Jaylen Fryberg, a well-liked freshman and homecoming prince.

Snohomish County Sheriff’s spokeswoman Shari Ireton said in a statement Saturday morning that the on-scene investigation at the high school was finished. A .40-caliber handgun was recovered, which authorities believe was the weapon used in the shooting, Ireton said.

Detectives confirmed the cafeteria worker attempted to intervene in the attack, but Ireton provided no other details about the worker’s actions.

It does not appear that Fryberg chose his targets at random. Two of the victims —

15-year-old Andrew Fryberg and

14-year-old Nate Hatch

are

his cousins, relatives said. Two other girls were also wounded.

Nate Hatch’s grandfather, Don Hatch, told KOMO-TV that his grandson was close friends with the other victims in the shooting, as well as Jaylen Fryberg. The group had recently attended prom together, he added.

“Only God knows what escalated this. Only God knows. Nobody pushed a button with bullying. It’s just something that happened, and we don’t know why,” Hatch said.

The two 14-year-old girls remained in critical condition Saturday. As of Friday, Andrew Fryberg was also in critical condition. Nate Hatch is listed in serious condition.

Erick Cervantes, a student at the school who witnessed the shootings, from the events beforehand until the moment the gunman shot himself, told KIRO-TV that teacher Megan Silberberger confronted Fryberg before he shot himself. Officials did not identify her as the cafeteria worker they say tried to intervene in the shooting.

“I believe she’s actually the real hero. She’s the one that intercepted him with the gun. He tried either reloading or tried aiming at her. She tried moving his hand away and he tried shooting and shot himself in the neck,” Cervantes told the TV station.

He said the gunshots followed a verbal altercation.

“It started off with an argument, but then I looked back and there was just gunshots and just people falling down,” Cervantes recalled. And immediately after the gunshots, the (woman) intervened, he said.

“She heard the gunshots first and she came in running through the door, right next to it,” he recalled.

Student Jordan Luton told CNN he was finishing lunch at the Marysville, Wash., school when he saw the shooting unfold. He said he saw Fryberg go up to a table with students, then fire “about six bullets into the backs of them … They were his friends, so it wasn’t just random.”

Austin Taylor was seated at a table next to the gunman: “All of sudden he stands up, pulls something out of his pocket,” he told KING-TV. “At first I thought it was someone making a really loud noise like a bag, a loud pop. There were four more after that. I saw three kids just fall from the table, like they were falling to the ground dead.”

He said the shooter “was just staring down every one of his victims as he shot them.”

More than 1,000 people crowded into to The Grove Church for a candlelight vigil Friday night in response to the shooting.

Students, teachers and parents from the school and other rival high schools came together along with other community members to share in grief and offer each other comfort.

“On the one hand, I want to comfort and encourage others and bear their burdens, and on another hand, I’m in this community too, and it hurts,” Lead Pastor Nik Baumgard said, struggling to hold back tears.

Governor Jay Inslee spoke at the vigil and asked Washingtonians to take extra time with their families in light of this tragic shooting.

“We need to tell our children they’re not alone tonight and in the days to come,” Inslee said.

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Contributing: Danielle Leigh, KING 5 News; The Associated Press

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‘He Seemed Like A Normal Kid’: Rage Behind Washington Gunman’s Spree – NBCNews.com

By M. Alex Johnson

Just last week, Jaylen Ray Fryberg was smiling and waving to the crowd at Marysville Pilchuck High School’s homecoming ceremony. He’d just been crowned freshman homecoming prince. But inside, terrible turmoil was raging.

Law enforcement sources told NBC News that Fryberg was the student who pulled out a small handgun and opened fire on a table full of students in the cafeteria Friday morning at the school in Marysville, about 35 miles north of Seattle. A girl was killed and four other young people were seriously or critically wounded, and Fryberg soon was dead himself of a self-inflicted gunshot wound.

“He seemed like a normal kid,” Madison White, 16, a junior, told NBC News. Erick Cervantes, 16, a junior, told NBC News: “He seemed like a nice guy, and he had lots of friends.”

Others called Fryberg a happy guy who was popular with his classmates. He was proud of his Native American heritage as a member of the Tulalip Tribes. He was a member of the wrestling and football teams.

But the Jaylen Fryberg who walked into the cafeteria Friday morning was blank-faced and angry, staring down each victim as he pulled the trigger of his .40-caliber Beretta pistol, classmates said. The Snohomish County Sheriff’s Office, which spent Friday night investigating inside the school, said they recovered a .40-caliber handgun.

“He looked very mad” on Friday, Erick said. The sheriff’s office said Saturday morning that investigators interviewed more than 100 witnesses, and determined that a cafeteria worker attempted to stop Fryberg. But everything happened too fast.

It was all over in four minutes, Marysville police Cmdr. Robb Lamoureux said. The first anonymous call to 911 came in at 10:39 a.m. By 10:41, the school resource officer was on the scene, and by 10:43, it was confirmed that “the shooter was down,” Lamoureux said. The wounded were being treated by 10:49 — just 10 minutes after the incident began.

All four of them — two girls and two boys — are under the age of 18 and weren’t identified. They were initially taken to Providence Regional Medical Center in Everett, where the girls were in critical condition with gunshot wounds to the head Friday night. Joanne Roberts, the hospital’s chief medical officer, said doctors were monitoring their brain activity. She offered no prognosis Friday night.

A 15-year-old boy had surgery for a gunshot wound to the head at Providence and was then taken to Harborview Medical Center in Seattle, where he was in critical condition. The fourth victim, a 14-year-old boy, was also taken to Harborview, where he was in serious condition with a gunshot wound to the jaw. Two other students were treated at the school for minor injuries, according to Shari Ireton, director of communications at the Snohomish County Sheriff’s Office.

School is canceled next week, and more than 100 people attended a vigil Friday night to comfort one another.

IMAGE: Jaylen Ray FrybergJAYLEN_RAY_33 VIA INSTAGRAM

Jaylen Ray Fryberg, the student who opened fire at Marysville Pilchuck High School in Marysville, Washington, on Friday.

Police haven’t released any motive in the attack. But classmates said Fryberg had recently gotten into an argument with another student that had racial overtones, and law enforcement sources said he may have been in a recent dispute over a girl.

In posts on Twitter, Fryberg seemed heartbroken over a breakup.

Sometime in mid-June, Fryberg began tweeting often-profane and sexually charged sentiments. Many of the posts appear to express his despair at having lost his girlfriend, whose identity isn’t made clear.

“Don’t talk to you? ohk! That’s what I was doing last night!” he tweeted in mid-June.

“I know it seems like I’m sweating it off. But I’m not.”

Fryberg largely stopped tweeting through July and the first half of August. Then he began sending a stream of angry tweets on Aug. 20: “Your not gonna like what happens next!” one read, followed by: “Tell me what your plan is….You can’t make a bond with anyone like the bond me and you have right now…. Tell me what your going to do…”

The same day: “I hate that I can’t live without you.”

On Sept. 18, Fryberg sent another series of angry tweets addressed to a second party who isn’t identified. “Did you forget she was my girlfriend?” he begins. Then: “Dude. She tells me everything. And now. I f—ing HATE you! Your no longer my “Brother”!”

Tuesday — less than a week after he’d been all smiles at his homecoming coronation — Fryberg tweeted: “I know it seems like I’m sweating it off. But I’m not. And I never will be able to,” and “I should have listened…. You were right… The whole time you were right…”

Early Thursday morning, about a day and a half before the shooting, Fryberg sent this final tweet:

First published October 25 2014, 1:59 AM

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‘He Seemed Like A Normal Kid’: Rage Behind Washington Gunman’s Spree – NBCNews.com

By M. Alex Johnson

Just last week, Jaylen Ray Fryberg was smiling and waving to the crowd at Marysville Pilchuck High School’s homecoming ceremony. He’d just been crowned freshman homecoming prince. But inside, terrible turmoil was raging.

Law enforcement sources told NBC News that Fryberg was the student who pulled out a small handgun and opened fire on a table full of students in the cafeteria Friday morning at the school in Marysville, about 35 miles north of Seattle. A girl was killed and four other young people were seriously or critically wounded, and Fryberg soon was dead himself of a self-inflicted gunshot wound.

“He seemed like a normal kid,” Madison White, 16, a junior, told NBC News. Erick Cervantes, 16, a junior, told NBC News: “He seemed like a nice guy, and he had lots of friends.”

Others called Fryberg a happy guy who was popular with his classmates. He was proud of his Native American heritage as a member of the Tulalip Tribes. He was a member of the wrestling and football teams.

But the Jaylen Fryberg who walked into the cafeteria Friday morning was blank-faced and angry, staring down each victim as he pulled the trigger of his .40-caliber Beretta pistol, classmates said.

“He looked very mad” on Friday, Erick said.

It was all over in four minutes, Marysville police Cmdr. Robb Lamoureux said. The first anonymous call to 911 came in at 10:39 a.m. By 10:41, the school resource officer was on the scene, and by 10:43, it was confirmed that “the shooter was down,” Lamoureux said. The wounded were being treated by 10:49 — just 10 minutes after the incident began.

All four of them — two girls and two boys — are under the age of 18 and weren’t identified. They were initially taken to Providence Regional Medical Center in Everett, where the girls were in critical condition with gunshot wounds to the head Friday night. Joanne Roberts, the hospital’s chief medical officer, said doctors were monitoring their brain activity. She offered no prognosis Friday night.

A 15-year-old boy had surgery for a gunshot wound to the head at Providence and was then taken to Harborview Medical Center in Seattle, where he was in critical condition. The fourth victim, a 14-year-old boy, was also taken to Harborview, where he was in serious condition with a gunshot wound to the jaw.

School is canceled next week, and more than 100 people attended a vigil Friday night to comfort one another.

IMAGE: Jaylen Ray FrybergJAYLEN_RAY_33 VIA INSTAGRAM

Jaylen Ray Fryberg, the student who opened fire at Marysville Pilchuck High School in Marysville, Washington, on Friday.

Police haven’t released any motive in the attack. But classmates said Fryberg had recently gotten into an argument with another student that had racial overtones, and law enforcement sources said he may have been in a recent dispute over a girl.

In posts on Twitter, Fryberg seemed heartbroken over a breakup.

Sometime in mid-June, Fryberg began tweeting often-profane and sexually charged sentiments. Many of the posts appear to express his despair at having lost his girlfriend, whose identity isn’t made clear.

“Don’t talk to you? ohk! That’s what I was doing last night!” he tweeted in mid-June.

“I know it seems like I’m sweating it off. But I’m not.”

Fryberg largely stopped tweeting through July and the first half of August. Then he began sending a stream of angry tweets on Aug. 20: “Your not gonna like what happens next!” one read, followed by: “Tell me what your plan is….You can’t make a bond with anyone like the bond me and you have right now…. Tell me what your going to do…”

The same day: “I hate that I can’t live without you.”

On Sept. 18, Fryberg sent another series of angry tweets addressed to a second party who isn’t identified. “Did you forget she was my girlfriend?” he begins. Then: “Dude. She tells me everything. And now. I f—ing HATE you! Your no longer my “Brother”!”

Tuesday — less than a week after he’d been all smiles at his homecoming coronation — Fryberg tweeted: “I know it seems like I’m sweating it off. But I’m not. And I never will be able to,” and “I should have listened…. You were right… The whole time you were right…”

Early Thursday morning, about a day and a half before the shooting, Fryberg sent this final tweet:

First published October 25 2014, 1:59 AM

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